The most important class, however, for me and for hundreds of other Hungarian musicians, was the chamber-music class. From about the age of fourteen, and until graduation from the Academy, all instrumentalists except the heavy-brass players and percussionists had to participate in this course. Presiding over it for many years was the composer Leó Weiner, who thus exercised an enormous influence on three generations of Hungarian musicians.

Sir Georg Solti
MÁV Symphony Orchestra

23 February 2024, 19.00-21.30

Grand Hall

MÁV Symphony Orchestra

Tales, Dances

Brahms: Hungarian Dances No. 17–21, WoO 1
Wieniawski: Violin Concerto No. 1 in F-sharp minor, Op. 14

INTERMISSION

Ravel: Ma mère l’oye
Ravel: La valse

Abouzahra Amira (violin)
MÁV Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Péter Csaba

Péter Csaba, the permanent guest conductor of MÁV Symphony Orchestra is truly fond of Brahms’ Hungarian Dances, especially the lesser known ones, and he has chosen five of them, along with treasured pieces from his current home country, France. Maurice Ravel’s fairy-tale illustrations are the pinnacle of orchestration artistry, while his symphonic poem on the waltz captures the intoxicating effect of the legendary dance. The conductor, who started his career as a violinist in Transylvania and moved to Hungary in 1952, has not been unfaithful to his instrument, and he also supports the professional development of young talents, including Amira Abouzahra, who was born in 2005 to a Hungarian–Egyptian family of renowned pianists. She started playing the violin at the age of 4, and was already performing in public at the age of 5. In 2017, she won first prize in her age group at the Hungarian ‘Virtuosos’ classical music television talent contest. She has performed in her home country, and among numerous European cities, in Germany and Hungary, and also in Oman.

Presented by

MÁV Symphony Orchestra

Tickets:

HUF 5 400, 6 000, 6 600