Please allow me that, apart from my regrettable ignorance of the Hungarian language, I remain Magyar in my heart and soul from birth to the grave. As a consequence, I earnestly wish to further the progress of Hungarian music.

Liszt to Antal Augusz
Alexander Janiczek & Márta Gulyás Chamber Recital

12 April 2024, 19.00-21.00

Solti Hall

Radio Evenings at the Liszt Academy

Alexander Janiczek & Márta Gulyás Chamber Recital

Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 17 in C major, K. 296
Brahms: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 2 in A major, Op. 100

INTERMISSION

Janáček: Sonata for Violin and Piano
Bartók:
Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 2, BB 85

Alexander Janiczek (violin), Márta Gulyás (piano)

Violinist Alexander Janiczek has a special relationship with Hungary. He has ties to Hungary mainly through his master and mentor Sándor Végh, but he has also been to Budapest for various events: he has participated in some projects of the Festival Orchestra and took part in the 2018 kamara.hu festival of the Liszt Academy's chamber orchestra. Sándor Végh was a grand old man of 20th-century music, an apostle of chamber music, primarius of the Hungarian String Quartet and the Végh Quartet, and chamber partner of Casals, Menuhin, Horszowski, Dohnányi, Kempf and Serkin, among others. The chamber orchestra of the Mozarteum in Salzburg, the Camerata Academica, enjoyed a golden age under Sándor Végh. While he helped his chamber ensembles to world fame, his famously difficult and complicated nature was hard to bear for many. But he appreciated Alexander Janiczek's talents: he gave the young Janiczek  the Camerata's concertmaster's chair and even tried him out as a soloist and conductor. In the Mozart and Brahms sonatas, it will be exciting to experience the living tradition of Végh's legacy through the violinist's personality. Throughout his life, Sándor Végh enthusiastically promoted Bartók's oeuvre, keeping his string quartets in his repertoire. The second half of the concert will feature an exciting pairing of Leoš Janáček's composition and Béla Bartók's Violin and Piano Sonata No. 2. The content of the two works - their tension, their pessimism, their heartbreaking lyricism - is very similar. But their language and structure are completely different, and their style, while different in character, is inextricably linked to the folk music roots of their respective countries.

Presented by

MTVA, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets:

HUF 1500